Conclusions to a Medical Self-Analysis


Part Three

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  • I have a lot of stuff going on.
  • Everything seems to be connected to everything
  • I’m worried about my medications, almost as worried as I am about my health problems for which I’m taking the prescriptions
  • My poor health makes it hard to focus on the various ailments and their causes.
  • I’m tired of being sick and tired.
  • Knowing that I need to make changes, and even being aware of some of the changes I need to make, doesn’t mean that I have the energy or clarity of purpose to stay the course and do what is necessary to improve my health.

It is obvious from reviewing my medications and their various side effects in the context of my various ailments that some of my problems may be made worse or even caused by the side effects of one or more of my medications.

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I missed a couple of my medications when I listed my prescriptions and side-effects, the most important of which is Humulin 70/30 which I take in the morning with breakfast and a dinner, both 60 units each time.

Humulin 70-30 Insulin

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Humulin 70-30 (70% human insulin isophane suspension and 30% human insulin) is a man-made form of a hormone that is produced in the body used to treat diabetes. The most common side effect of Humulin 70-30 is low blood sugar (hypoglycemia). Symptoms of low blood sugar may include headache, nausea, hunger, confusion, drowsiness, weakness, dizziness, blurred vision, fast heartbeat, sweating, tremor, trouble concentrating, confusion, or seizure(convulsions). Other side effects of Humulin 70-30 include: injection site reactions (e.g., pain, redness, irritation), skin thickening or pits at the injection site (lipodystrophy), itching, rash, weight gain, and swelling of your hands and feet.

Tell your doctor if you have serious side effects of Humulin 70-30 including signs of low potassium level in the blood (such as muscle cramps, weakness, irregular heartbeat).

Each patient’s diabetes is different, and the injection schedule and use of Humulin 70-30 is individualized. A doctor determines which insulin to use, how much, and when and how often to inject it. Humulin 70-30 may interact with albuterolclonidine, reserpine, guanethidine, or beta-blockers. Tell your doctor all medications you are taking. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant before using Humulin 70-30. If you are planning pregnancy, discuss a plan for managing your blood sugars with your doctor before you become pregnant. Your doctor may switch the type of insulin you use during pregnancy. This medication does not pass into breast milk. Consult your doctor before breastfeeding. Insulin needs may change while breastfeeding.

Medical Editor: John P. Cunha, DO, FACOEPLast reviewed on RxList 12/9/2016
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The next step is to review the side effects of each medication, and benefits of each, to determine what I should do. At the very least I need to review the interaction of these medications to figure out which of them are making my health worse, and which better.

Already I have some concrete ideas about improving my situation, including getting back into using my CPAP machine, recommitting to losing weight, and concentrate of getting more exercise.

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